How to Protect Your Brand on the Scariest Day of the Year

Posted on October 31, 2013

We won’t take up too much of your time reading a blog post today. There are mini M&M’s to collect and fake blood to apply. But for social media marketers, there’s also community management. And if there’s one lesson marketers can take away from today it’s maintaining brand standards. Below are examples of the tricks and treats brands have used to effectively (or not) market their brand on Halloween.

Treats

Create campaigns that still cater to your style and tone of voice. Don’t change your overall messaging, but incorporate it in a way that is still relevant to who you are and promotes your sales goals.

Shoedazzle

The online shoe retailer updated their welcome header to reflect Halloween imagery, while still encouraging shopping behavior and rewarding customers for participating in their themed “Easter Egg” hunt. The website has its same look and feel, without abandoning their chic pink color scheme.

Crumbs bake shop

Instead of going the obvious route with photos of black and orange cupcakes (which they have and are delicious), national bake shop Crumbs created a Halloween themed e-mail marketing campaign, hypnotizing you with a Dracula figure and a direct link to find your nearest Crumbs location. Like the e-mail says, they really are much better than garlic.

Joann Fabrics

The craft megastore is offering .31 flat rate shipping to all their customers using a custom code. Both the numeral and the code reflect Halloween-centricities, without overhauling their image and changing their consistent messaging for easy and accessible arts and crafts. Also, if you’re in the market for a last minute Halloween costume, JoAnns is the place to go. Run.

Tricks

It’s not a treat if you stray away from your identity just to celebrate Halloween. Sure, your picture will get a lot of likes and entertain a lot of users, but your Social ROI will be walking a tight rope. And like on all other days, what you post should follow brand standards.

Mixed Messaging

Make sure your messaging is native to the overall purpose and value statements of your brand. A dentist office can show fans they’re thinking about Halloween without compromising their mission to protect teeth.

Offensive Content

Do not promote any kind of costume or imagery that’s offensive to any one race or gender. We’re looking at you, Slutty Witch costume for toddlers.

Broken links

If you are sending users to an e-commerce site for a “tasty” Halloween treat, make sure we’ll be able to indulge.

Make sense? What Halloween social media posts have inspired you? Share with us on Twitter and Facebook and see what terrifying (but branded) holiday post we have on our page!

Then go forth, and hoard collect candy.